Authentic Presentations

State Fair 2

Traditionally children demonstrated what they learned through written reports and tests.  However, not only do many children not demonstrate well this way, moving forward into this century, this is not the way that creative and innovative thinkers will demonstrate what they know.

There are many, many different ways for children to show what they have learned.  Authentic learning needs authentic demonstration.  Children should be encouraged to show what they have learned in ways that they are comfortable with and confident about.  They should also be encouraged to demonstrate mastery of what they know in unique and new ways.

Photo-Journals, Computer Presentations, Literary Works, Scripts, Performances, Posters, Demonstrations, Competitions, Models, Dioramas, Correspondence…

In the back of our back One School’s Journey we made a list of all of the ways that students had demonstrated learning/presented projects in our school.  Honestly, we could probably double that list a year later.  As our students became more comfortable with authentic learning they evolved with the unique ways they presented what they had learned.  These are the kinds of doers and thinkers that will make it, and make a difference in this coming century!

Authentic Teaching – Math

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My husband and I recently rediscovered Yahtzee.  I have always loved this game.  Lots of strategy and math.

When it came time to add up my score, I got up to grab my cell phone to use the calculator.  It dawned on me that I was missing an easy authentic math experience – for me.  Rather than allow my brain to become rusty – I added up my score myself!

Authentic learning does not always have to involve a big project.  The point of authentic learning is to make it real and make it count.  Sometimes this involves a big project.  Sometimes a short and sweet project.  And sometimes just an authentic experience.

There are many wonderful math games to play with children that improve math skills.  Just don’t forget that keeping track of and adding up scores are also fantastic authentic math experiences.  This is also a great authentic way to teach estimation – before actually adding up the scores, do a quick estimation to see who probably won.  And a great authentic way to teach checking your work – add of the score two times to make sure you get the same number both times.

By not grabbing that cell phone or calculator at the end of the game to add up the scores, you can double or triple the authentic math skills practiced and reinforced.  And in case you are wondering – I won that round of Yahtzee!  This doesn’t usually happen, so I think it is important to note this on my blog.

Being Authentic

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I recently received an email from a teacher asking me what inspired my ideas for projects.

When I was teaching, I was inspired by what the students were interested in.  Ok, that is not a totally honest answer.  I was inspired by my love of space, and in particular my fascination with Mars.  It was easy for me to be creative and stay engaged.  Doing research on my own time was not an added chore, I was already reading everything that I could get my hands on.  I didn’t need to hunt for materials, I was able to put what I had already collected to good use.  And my enthusiasm for Mars was contagious.  When a teacher is excited and engaged, the students become excited and engaged.

But, a good authentic project requires the teacher to listen to student discourse and alter plans accordingly.  With the Martian Colony Project that was easy, because we could incorporate just about anything into the open-ended plans for our colony.  Sports – no problem – we created a Martian football league.  Fashion – clothing designs for Mars.  Government – that was huge – laying the groundwork for a new colonial government (easy tie in to the formation of our U.S. government, tons of history lessons there). Spa – Hey, I wasn’t spending the rest of my life on Mars with a bunch of fifth graders without a lot of manicures, pedicures, and pampering!

Every one of these topics involved a basic understanding of Space Exploration and Mars, and included almost unlimited opportunities for reading, writing, math, social studies, science…

Even the planning for the spa, actually especially the planning for the spa, involved a great deal of research, writing, math, science… (The spa started as a snarky suggestion from a group of fifth-grade girls who were doing everything possible to not engage in the colony.  These girls ended up being our most engaged students.)

Now that I am retired (forever a teacher, however), I have time to stop and smell the roses.  A whole lot of roses!  And I photograph everything for my scrapbooks.  And invariably I end up seeing authentic projects in these photos.  (And entering them in our local Grange Fair and winning a lot of ribbons, but that is another story!)

Being retired means that I can spend my time following my passions – like writing this blog!  I can spend time doing the things that I love to do. I am being authentic.  And when you are being authentic, doing something you love to do, you want to explore and learn more.  Isn’t that what good teaching should be?

We Pause for an Authentic Station Identification

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This is my 100th post!  I started this blog over a year ago to promote my first children’s book.  That is the total, honest truth. But being authentic to myself, the purpose of the blog quickly changed.

I live in a retirement community near a major university.  Many of the people in my neighborhood are retired professors and savvy about the book publishing and promotion world.  When my first book came out, the women in my knitting group told me I needed a presence on the web to promote my book. They told me I needed to start a blog.  They actually chased me out of the knitting group that day, and sent me home to start my blog.

The only problem was, I had never been on a blog!  I didn’t know what a blog was.  So, I started to do some research and by the end of the day I had opened my blog.

The-Educational-Journey started as a vehicle to promote my books, but it quickly moved beyond that.  It took me about five minutes into creating my blog, that I realized it could be a platform for something I am truly passionate about, authentic learning – also referred to as project-based learning.  (I am very passionate about my books, but honestly not that passionate about marketing.)

Even though I was retired, I realized that everywhere I looked I still saw projects and authentic opportunities.  My blog gave me the platform to share these ideas.

I keep thinking that eventually I will run out of ideas.  Eventually, my weekly posts will become monthly.  This might happen, but now I kind of doubt it.  If anything, I am seeing more and more authentic project ideas every day.

Ironically another hobby has “upped my game.”  I joined a scrapbooking group in my community and have learned to photograph everything.  You just never know when you will want a photo of something you did or saw for a scrapbook page.  Not surprisingly, these photos also inspire ideas for authentic learning and projects.

As a retired (but forever) teacher, I now have time to “stop and smell the roses.” And each and every one of these roses gives me an idea for a new authentic experience.  And authentic ideas often lead down a path to unexpected new and different ideas.

If you think about it, I photograph things I am interested in or passionate about.  These photos represent authenticity to me.  I don’t photograph things that don’t interest or inspire me.  So, staying authentic keeps me engaged and excited and learning.  This is the way authentic learning works!  It grabs you, engages you, and doesn’t let you go. (And if I ever post a photograph of a snake, you can be sure my husband took the picture, I am having an “off” week, and decided to blog about project ideas with snakes – YUCK!)

You’ve made 100 posts on The Educational Journey.

Authentic Teaching – Teaching Outside the Box

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I had an opportunity a few years ago to visit the Falkirk Wheel in Scotland.  I knew that this was some sort of structure that raised and lowered boats, sort of like a lock does.  However, I really couldn’t picture it and was totally surprised when our tour arrived at the Wheel.  It was nothing like what I imagined.

To me, this structure truly represents why authentic teaching and learning is so important.  The Falkirk Wheel is totally different from traditional locks.  This represents true “outside of the box” thinking.

We are heading into a future that we can’t even imagine.  Educating children in the traditional way of “one correct answer, one way to accomplish your goal, color inside the lines using the correct color, stay inside the box” is not going to prepare them for the future.  The jobs that many of our children will hold don’t even exist yet.  And many of the jobs people hold now, will not exist in the future.

Authentic teaching prepares students for this future world.  Make it real.  Make it count.

*And riding in a boat that was raised by the Falkirk Wheel was really cool!

Authentic Teaching: Same Inspiration – Different Projects

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On a road trip recently, my husband and I passed a mountain range covered with wind turbines.  They were actually quite beautiful and engaging to watch.  I stopped to photograph them and started to think about all of the different authentic projects they could inspire.  Building a model demonstrating how wind turbines work. Exploring other sources of unlimited energy.  Learning about some of the problems with the turbines.  Proposing solutions for these problems. Controversies?  Other sources of unlimited energy…  Sources of limited energy…

I then remembered a beautiful quilt that a friend of mine had made of wind turbines.  Yes, it is an unusual quilt, she does unusual work!  So, the wind turbines inspired her to create a work of art.  Which then led to other quilts showing different sources of energy, and her most unusual quilt to date, toxic waste drums – it is an absolutely gorgeous and unique quilt.

We have always allowed adults to take a topic and run with it.  Not only in art, but in science, math, business…  Actually, this is encouraged in places that value creative thinking.  Shouldn’t educators be encouraging the same thing?

We are educating children for jobs that don’t even exist yet.  They will work in environments, doing jobs, that we probably can’t even imagine.  Ingenuity and creative thinking will be mandatory for them to prosper.  So, shouldn’t we be not only letting children, but encouraging them to look at something and explore it in a way that is meaningful to them.  Look at a question or a problem, and then tackle it with as much creativity, and divergent thinking as they possibly can?  Take the road less traveled.  Diverge, create, branch off, discover, explore…Authentic Learning.

WindMillsEnergy copyQuilt by Chris Staver

Budgeting for Materials for Projects

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While students should be encouraged to find what they need for projects, focusing on creativity, using recyclables etc, sometimes something is needed that has to be purchased.  There are so many authentic lessons that can be included in this process.  Giving students a budget to work with is not only a great way to use and reinforce math, it also makes students aware of what they are spending, what they really need, and creative ways to get what they need.

When building dioramas, several fourth graders were adamant that they needed modeling clay.  We approached this by telling them that the teachers were willing to put up $10 to buy clay.  $10 for the entire class.  The students searched on line and realized that even finding the best price, that was not a lot of clay for 30 students.  After some discussion and problem solving, the kids decided to make their own clay. They still needed to buy materials to make clay, but the $10 provided by teachers was more than enough to get the materials they needed.

The authentic experience even moved into the science of color mixing as they bought food coloring to dye the clay the colors they needed. And it also moved into the authentic discussion of, and research about, what was the best laundry detergent to try to get red food coloring out of my white skirt.  Sigh…